William G. Kaelin Jr., M.D.

William G. Kaelin Jr., M.D.

Professor, Department of Medicine

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School

William G. Kaelin, Jr., M.D., is professor in the Department of Medicine at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School. He was elected to the board of directors of Eli Lilly and Company in June 2012.

Kaelin received his degree in medicine from Duke University in 1982 and was a house officer and chief resident in internal medicine at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was a medical oncology clinical fellow at Dana-Farber and a postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. David Livingston, where he began his studies of tumor suppressor proteins. He became an independent investigator at Dana-Farber in 1992 and professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School in 2002. He joined the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in 1998.

Kaelin is a member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation (ASCI) and the American College of Physicians. He recently served on the National Cancer Institute Board of Scientific Advisors, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Board of Trustees, and the Institute of Medicine National Cancer Policy Board. He is a recipient of the Paul Marks Prize for cancer research from the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, the Richard and Hinda Rosenthal Prize from the AACR, and a Doris Duke Distinguished Clinical Scientist award. In 2007, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine. In 2010, Kaelin was elected to the National Academy of Sciences and was a co-recipient of the 2010 Canada International Gairdner Award. In 2012, Kaelin was a co-recipient of both the ASCI’s Stanley J. Korsmeyer Award and the Scientific Grand Prix of the Foundation Lefoulon-Delalande and was elected to the Association of American Physicians. In 2014, he won the Wiley Biomedical Prize from the Rockefeller University and the Steven C. Beering Award from the Indiana University School of Medicine. In 2016, he won the Albert B. Lasker Basic Medical Research Award.